Thai rice with oriental-scented vegetables and wild fruit salad

This recipe is one of my favorites; it’s very simple and quick, it’s a vegetarian recipe – well, I’m not 100% vegetarian, but I prefer to avoid meat during working days – and it’s easy to realize with few ingredients and spices. I like to buy vegetables from local markets, clean them and slice them in cubes. Then I freeze them in small packets, in order to have them ready for cooking whenever I want. Moreover, I love cooking these kind of vegetables – aubergines, courgettes – and flavoring them with Mediterranean spices like thyme, oregano, tarragon and marjoram. Combining vegetables with thai rice (or cous-cous) creates a good mixture, that reminds me Middle Eastern cuisine.

Ingredients for 2 persons:

100gr thai rice (a mixture of black and white rice)
1 big aubergine
2-3 courgettes
A handful of

  • Pine nuts
  • Raisins

2 clove of garlic
A pinch of

  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Oregano
  • Thyme

2 spoons of Olive oil
500gr of wildberries (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries)
1 lemon
2-3 spoons of brown sugar

Cooking time: 20-30 minutes.

Cut to cubes both aubergine and courgettes and keep them separated. You have to do so because aubergine and courgettes have different baking time and spices.

First of all you have to cook the aubergine in a pan, then the courgettes in another one. If you have only one pan I advise you to use the same pan but to wash it before using it for courgettes.

Warm up one spoon of olive oil in a heat friyng pan. Pan-fry the aubergine cubes until they’re well cooked (be careful not to burn or to boil them), then flavor them with some pine nuts, salt, pepper and oregano. Add some spoons of water in order to not burn them. You don’t have to cook them too much; they’re better a little bit raw ;)

Do the same for the courgettes, but use raisins and thyme instead of pine nuts and oregano.
These spices will make courgette and aubergine cubes more tasty.

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Meanwhile boil a small pot of water for the rice. Do not use so much water and salt: it’s better to add water if necessary during cooking, in order to obtain perfect “al dente” rice. Drain well the rice and keep it separated to other ingredients in order to cool down its temperature.

Finally prepare the “wild” fruit salad: wash strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries. Cut the strawberries and squeeze one lemon in order to retrieve its juice. Mix these fruits with the juice and a couple of sugar spoons.

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You can serve rice and vegetables heated or at room-temperature.

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Welcome To Log4Bento

This blog has only one purpose: to connect some hobbies of mine. Food and Photography.
I love cooking, I absolutely love taking photographs of everything I think is beautiful, and in particular food, which is for me an expression of life and joy.
I don’t like so much to follow a recipe: I prefer to improvise, and let my noose and my eyes help me in the kitchen as much as some meticulous instructions.

Cooking for me is something like taking care of people I love; it’s like committing time to them, cuddling them with their favorite meals, and surprising them with something unexpected.
Cooking together with someone I really care about it’s a strange kind of love: a unique and elaborate dance with knives, wooden spoons, pots and pans, during which there’s no need to talk, and you only have to catch the eye of your partner.
At the same time, cooking is a gift I make for myself when I’m alone. It’s like a way to find again my dimension after a stressful working day and relaxing. And when food is good as soon as pop from the pan, the same dish is better the day after, brought to work for the lunch break.

Japanese people call Bento their lunch box.
According to Wikipedia, Bento is a home-packed meal that holds rice, fish or meat. Japanese homemakers often spend time and energy on a carefully prepared lunch box for their spouse, child, or themselves.
I don’t expect to be as good as Japanese homemakers but I think that every time I bring my Bento at work, it’s like bringing something magic to my lunch break. And no sandwich or pre-cooked food can compare to it. Now the challenge is to arrange them in a nice way and in a small package, in order to have everything I need into the box.

At last, given that I’m a software developer and quite a geek, I hope it’s obvious why I decided to call this not-so-conventional cooking blog, Log.

So, stay tuned for recipes and ideas to come ;-)

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